Introduction

The Design & Technology Department at Chipping Norton School is committed to planning, developing and delivering a program of study that provides our students with the broadest possible opportunity. At the root of the department is the desire to deliver a curriculum which has creativity at its core. Students are encouraged to become problem solvers and are engaged in the analysis and solving of real problems to create high quality outcomes. This is achieved through imaginative teaching and learning, that embraces new technologies, whilst retaining the best of traditional practice. Above all we aim to encourage a creative and innovative atmosphere, which allows students to take risks in a safe and positive environment, all of which is underpinned by secure knowledge and understanding.

Department Aims

  • To enable students to combine their designing and making skills with knowledge and understanding, in order for them to design, make, analyse and evaluate high quality products.
  • To establish an environment which is conductive to learning, is stimulating, imaginative and where students feel supported and secure.
  • To value the work of all students, using assessment as a means of monitoring student progress, providing information in relation to attainment on a national scale and to form a basis for individual action plans with more demanding targets.
  • To create a team where staff have strong personal skills and are prepared to share these to the mutual benefit of the team.

The Staff Team

Mr K Newton – Head of Department - joined Chipping Norton School in 2005 and is a specialist teacher of Resistant Materials and CAD/CAM.

Prior to teaching he studied at Napier University, Edinburgh – BSc (Hons) Joint Honours in Computer Aided design and Information Technology.

University of the West of England, Bristol – Post Graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE).

Mr K McPhillips joined Chipping Norton School in 1989 and is a specialist teacher      in Graphics and Resistant Materials.

Mr S Crudge joined Chipping Norton School in 1989, as Head of Department, and is a specialist teacher of Resistant Materials.

Prior to teaching he studied at Exeter University – BEd (Hons) degree. Where his main subject was D&T and the specialism in this area was batch produced silver ware and Engineering.

Mrs J Drinkwater joined Chipping Norton School in 2013 and is a specialist teacher of Textiles.

Prior to teaching she worked as a Print Designer for Monsoon Accessorize and studied Textile Design at Winchester School of Art – University of Southampton.

Mr S Parker joined Chipping Norton School in 2009 and is a specialist teacher of Resistant Materials. Mr Parker is also a Head of Year and the Schools Work Experience Coordinator.

Prior to teaching he worked in the automotive industry and studied at Warwick University – MSc Engineering Business management.

Coventry University – B.Eng. (Hons) Automotive Design and Engineering.

Mrs J Brown joined Chipping Norton School in 2017 and is a specialist teacher in Food and Textiles.

Prior to teaching she studied at the Bath College of Further Education – BEd  degree in Textiles and Food.

Mrs Brown has also taught lower School Art and ‘Pencil’ Graphics.

Learning Spaces

  • F1 – Graphics Suite
  • F2 – Resistant Materials/Metals Workshop
  • F3 – Textiles
  • F4 – Computer room and CAD/CAM suite
  • F5 – Resistant Materials/Multi use Workshop
  • F6 – Textiles
  • F7 – Food
  • F8 – Resistant Materials Workshop

The Curriculum

Key Stage 3

Year 7

Students are introduced to Design and Technology and the many varying subjects under the D&T umbrella. The students follow a carousel system, rotating between Resistant Materials, System and Control and Textiles.

Within Resistant Materials, picture frame project, students learn the key concepts of working with wood, which  provides them with first hand practical experience working with tools, machinery, graphical presentation and CAM(where appropriate). They are introduced to the design process and the importance of assessing and evaluating their own work and the work of others, and the ability of designing for a chosen client.

Within Systems and Control, mechanisms project, the students are provided with the opportunity to design and model their ideas, using simple mechanisms to create a mechanical toy. They will also learn how to plan their manufacturing process to improve the quality of their making.

Within Textiles, sock monster project, students are taught to understand and demonstrate basic practical skills. Hand embroidery, blanket, running and back stitch as well as sewing on a button, sequin and bead.  They are then introduced to the design process where they are taught design and analytical skills to produce some creative designs for a sock monster, before bringing their ideas to life.

Year 8

As with year 7 the students will follow a carousel program to continue developing their knowledge and understanding of the main strands of Design and Technology. Students will rotate between Electronics-CAD/CAM, Resistant Materials and Graphics.

Within Electronics – CAD/CAM, mood light project, students will learn the key concepts of Computer Aided Design using Solidworks as a design tool while developing an understanding of Computer Aided Manufacturing through laser cutting. Students will also be introduced to Electronics and picchip programming through Picaxelogicator.

Within Graphics, board game project, where students redesign a travel size board game using Photoshop as a design tool.

Within Resistant Materials, upcycling project students learn about how much commercial and domestic waste is produced in the UK and the importance of the 6 R’s. The advantages of each strategy is discussed and the disadvantages of using Landfill. Students are then encouraged to think about their project design, product life cycle and material choices from an environmental point of view, when designing their up-cycling project.

Year 9

This year students will continue to develop their understanding of the three main strands of Design and Technology. They will further their understanding of materials and processes and improve their understanding of the design process.

This year in Food and Nutrition students will develop basic skills and how to adapt recipes to suit the Healthy Eating Guidelines. The pupils will also consider meal planning for different groups of people and food waste and provenance.

Within Resistant Materials in Year 9 more emphasis is put on the design process and creativity along with presentation of work, where we start to prepare them for their GCSE choices. We give students three design briefs where they can explore and use a range of materials, which targets creativity and their making skills. 

Through Textiles students are taught about modern fabrics and new technologies. Developing a repeating pattern using CAD and sublimation printing their own piece of fabric.  They are then given the opportunity to design an innovative product and turn their fabric into new and exciting product. Students will also learn to operate a sewing machine.

Key Stage 4 – AQA GCSE Design and Technology

GCSE Design and Technology incorporated all the Design and Technology subjects into one course and provides each student with the flexibility to design and develop products with a wider choice of systems, materials and processes. The new GCSE places greater emphasis on understanding and applying iterative design processes. Students will use their creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and other’s needs, wants and values.

Course Content

Unit 1 – Written Paper

50% of total marks

2 hours exam paper

Unit 2 – Design and Making Practice

Design and Making Non Examination Assessment (NEA)

50% of total marks

Key Stage 4 – WJEC/EDUQAS GCSE Food Preparation & Nutrition

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition specification equips students with an array of culinary techniques, as well as knowledge of nutrition, food traditions and kitchen safety. GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition will teach students the science behind the foods we eat, opening their eyes to a world of career opportunities and giving them the confidence to cook with ingredients from across the globe.

Course Content

Component 1;

Principles of Food Preparation and Nutrition. Written examination 1 hour 45mins; 50% of qualification.

Component 2 ;

Food preparation and Nutrition in action; non- examination assessments; internally assessed and externally moderated.

Assessment 1; approx. 8 hours – scientific food investigation. (15%)

Assessment 2; approx. 12 hours – research, plan, prepare and cook dishes suitable for a set menu. (35%)

50% of the qualification.

Key Stage 5 – AQA A Level Design and Technology: Product Design

This qualification is linear. Linear means that students will sit all their exams and submit all their non-exam assessment at the end of the course.

A-level Design and Technology: Product Design requires students to engage in both practical and theoretical study. This specification requires students to cover design and technology skills and knowledge as set out below. These have been separated into:

  • Technical principles
  • Designing and making principles.

Paper 1: Technical principles

Students are expected to be able to name specific materials for a wide range of applications.

They must also be able to provide detailed and justified explanations of why specific materials and combinations of materials are suitable for given applications.

Written exam: 2 hours and 30 minutes

  • 120 marks
  • 30% of A-level

Questions

Mixture of short answer and extended response.

Paper 2: Designing and making principles

Students should be aware of, and able to explain, different approaches to user centred design. That in approaching a design challenge there is not a single process, but that good design always addresses many issues.

  • Written exam: 1 hour and 30 minutes
  • 80 marks
  • 20% of A-level

Questions

Mixture of short answer and extended response questions.

Section A:

  • Product Analysis: 30 marks
  • Up to 6 short answer questions based on visual stimulus of product(s).

Section B:

  • Commercial manufacture: 50 marks
  • Mixture of short and extended response questions.
  • Non-exam assessment (NEA)

Practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles.

How it’s assessed

  • Substantial design and make project
  • 100 marks
  • 50% of A-level

Evidence

Written or digital design portfolio and photographic evidence of final prototype.

Key Stage 5 – AQA A Level Design and Technology: Fashion and Textiles

This creative and thought-provoking qualification gives students the practical skills, theoretical knowledge and confidence to succeed in a number of careers. Especially those in the creative industries.

They will investigate historical, social, cultural, environmental and economic influences on design and technology, whilst enjoying opportunities to put their learning in to practice by producing prototype of their choice.

Paper 1: Technical principles

Students are expected to be able to name specific materials for a wide range of applications.

They must also be able to provide detailed and justified explanations of why specific materials and combinations of materials are suitable for given applications.

Written exam: 2 hours and 30 minutes

  • 120 marks
  • 30% of A-level

Questions

Mixture of short answer and extended response.

Paper 2: Designing and making principles

Students should be aware of, and able to explain, different approaches to user centred design. That in approaching a design challenge there is not a single process, but that good design always addresses many issues.

  • Written exam: 1 hour and 30 minutes
  • 80 marks
  • 20% of A-level

Questions

Mixture of short answer and extended response questions.

Section A:

  • Product Analysis: 30 marks
  • Up to 6 short answer questions based on visual stimulus of product(s).

Section B:

  • Commercial manufacture: 50 marks.
  • Mixture of short and extended response questions.
  • Non-exam assessment (NEA)

Practical application of technical principles, designing and making principles.

Substantial design and make project.

  • 100 marks
  • 50% of A-level

Evidence

Written or digital design portfolio and photographic evidence of final prototype.